Idiot Testing LoraWan Gateway from Pi-Supply

I received the Pi Supply LoraWan Gateway to beta test or, as I prefer to say, to idiot test. My Lora knowledge is non existent. I expect I will be making a lot of beginner mistakes – which is why I’m calling this *idiot testing*.  Note that this is early stuff for the LoRa HAT and documentation is lacking for now. At least the type of documentation that I would need. Knowing Pi Supply, it won’t stay that way for long.

Assembly:

In this photo I already have the board and header assembled. I did not solder the header, I’m assuming (let’s see if I’m right, probably not) that it does not require soldering, similar to the Sense Hat. Also, posts are already in all four corners because I feel confident. Ah!

Ok, there’s this little black flap on the left which looks like that’s over the camera port on the Pi. I can lift it up and tilt it backwards, like I would do with the camera flap.

Pi Supply IoT LoRa Gateway HAT
Pi Supply IoT LoRa Gateway HAT

Oops, broke it.  I guess it wasn’t meant to be tilted backwards. Rather it seems to be just a protector in place for shipping. I removed it completely for now.

Broken Flap

HAT board:

Here’s the HAT itself.  I’ve already assembled it in this photo:

  1. Added the heat sink in the only way that would not cover the sticker. Hopefully that will work.
  2. Added an antenna.  The kit came with two antennae and I tried to assemble them last evening. My eyes are not what they used to be, astigmatism and old age don’t do well together. I need good day light.  So last night, I fumbled around not really seeing what needed to be done. The black antenna fit. Today in broad daylight, I can see that the other one would fit too. As of now, I have no idea which antenna I’m supposed to use.

IoT Lora HAT

Attaching both parts together:

This insertion is self explanatory. Fits only one way. Good, I feel confident.

20181124_124454.jpg

After insertion it looks like the following photo though. This begs to be pushed down!

20181124_131730Sure enough, look at those nice little metal clamps that hold it in place once pushed down! Wooh, nicely done. I love it when I find a new (to me) mechanism !
Also kinda happy I broke that black flap at the beginning. It would have been in the way here.
20181124_131748

 

At this point the board is all assembled, ready for its first boot up!

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Attempting to control my 3D printer with a Pi

Last week, I got my hands on my very own 3D printer, thanks to Marc-André Léger, from Learn to Make Almost Anything at District 3.

I got a test print done last Sunday, after hours spent trying to figure out how to level and calibrate it. The test print is still not perfect, but hey, it’s progress!

Today’s goal, because it’s nice outside and I do enjoy being stuck in a basement when it’s sunny out, is to control said printer via a Raspberry Pi. I just got 5 Pi3, all from BuyaPi.ca for work, which means I have a bunch of Pi2 that are no longer needed. Time to repurpose one!

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The many ways of running a program at boot on Raspberry Pi

This is a collection of tutorials that explain in various ways how to run something at boot

Crontab:

http://www.dexterindustries.com/howto/raspberry-pi-tutorials/auto-run-python-programs-on-the-raspberry-pi/

rc.local:
https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/linux/usage/rc-local.md

Crontab 2 (with logs)

http://www.instructables.com/id/Raspberry-Pi-Launch-Python-script-on-startup/step4/Add-to-your-crontab/

boot.rc (and .bashrc)

http://www.akeric.com/blog/?p=1976

 

/etc/init.d for executable script files (also mentions the other approaches)

http://pi.bek.no/autostartProgramOnBoot/